P.O.L.I.C.E. for Injury Recovery

🐶 Have you recently found yourself thinking “what am I suppose to do now, my vet is only taking emergency cases?” 😟

When your dog hurts, it sucks. 🥺 Having limited access to help adds to the frustration. 😫 So what do you do?

The answer? P.O.L.I.C.E.! 👮‍♀️⁉️🤷‍♀️

❌Not that kind of police!

This acronym is a comes from the physical therapy and injury recovery world.

✅Protect
✅Optimal
✅Loading
✅Ice
✅Compression
✅Early (this is actually Elevation but I prefer Early and will explain why)

⚠️ Now it goes without saying that if you dog has a catastrophic injury, you should have them seen by a vet as quickly as possible. These guidelines are for non emergency injuries.

🐾PROTECT – Create a safe environment and protect the injury site. This may include creating non slippery surfaces, hazard avoidance (stairs), a wrap or a bootie, etc.

🐾OPTIMAL LOADING – Once you know that there is no fracture or catastrophic injury, movement is best, but not too much too soon. Gentle passive to active range of motion (P/AROM) with gradual (days to weeks) introduction to functional activities is usually appropriate. You may require a harness or a sling to assist with this gradual process while protecting the injury.

🐾ICE – This is a controversial one because research shows that too much cold can actually slow the healing process. If there is a lot of swelling and pain, a cold pack wrapped in a cloth may assist with pain management along with prescribed medications. Sessions are 10-15 minutes max and discontinue after a couple days.

🐾COMPRESSION – While icing, you can add compression with vet wrap, an ace bandage or even a long sock or scarf. Not too tight! And check ever couple minutes.

🐾EARLY – This is usually Elevate, which can be tricky with a dog. But, Early refers to doing this protocol sooner than later. Early intervention after an injury has been shown to provide faster recovery.

🐶These recommendations apply to dogs and people!😊

P.O.L.I.C.E. is the updated R.I.C.E. (Rest Ice Compression Elevation). Optimal Loading encourages movement. Movement keeps the injured area mobile, reduces stiffness and may help with a faster recovery. 🙌

⚠️ONE MORE THING⚠️
If your dog has suffered an acute injury, a visit to your vet or canine rehab therapist is a necessary first step. He or she may recommend the P.O.L.I.C.E. method to help treat your dog’s injury. Following this method may help your dog return to normal activity quickly and safely. 👍

🙏Stay safe and healthy!🐶

#doginjury #selfisolating #covid19 #doghealth #caninerehabilitation

The Arthritis Pain Dilemma

Your dog looks stiff and is having issues getting around and going for regular walks.  They may have a diagnosis of osteoarthritis or degenerative joint disease, a form of arthritis that worsens overtime.  You’re advised to do less activity with them and that they may need some medication to manage the pain.

WHAT IF I TOLD YOU THAT YOU CAN DECREASE PAIN NATURALLY AND SLOW THE DISEASE PROGRESSION AND STILL ENJOY WALKING YOUR DOG?!?

Continue reading “The Arthritis Pain Dilemma”

Posture & Pain:

“Since dogs can’t talk, how do you know when they have mild pain or discomfort?

Sometimes the signs of something brewing are much more subtle and knowing what to look for is part of keeping them living long, active, and healthy lives. Even your dog’s stance reveals potential problem areas and discomfort.  How they carry their head, the placement of their feet under their body and the position of the tail all give signs of their physical wellbeing.  

Continue reading “Posture & Pain:”

Canine Back Pain & “Spondylosis”

Lola


Please welcome Lola to the Upward Dog Pack! This 16yo cutie has had some difficulty with coordination and weakness in her hind end as a result of a condition called spondylosis in her thoracic spine (mid spine where ribs attach). What is spondylosis? One might call it “age related changes” in your dog’s spine caused by everyday wear and tear and/or past trauma. Below is a little information on what the condition is, how it might look and what to do. Please note that this is general information and that it’s still important to seek out medical assistance. Continue reading “Canine Back Pain & “Spondylosis””

Can CCL tears be managed conservatively…. it depends!

This is a question I get a lot form pet parents/owners. There is no easy answer and it is a controversial subject. It depends on the size, age, breed, health, activity level, function, finances, and degree of tear, just to name a few factors. In many, but not all cases, surgery is often encouraged.


If your dog has been diagnosed with a cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) tear, regardless of whether or not you surgically or conservatively help your dog — *EARLY INTERVENTION IS KEY FOR RECOVERY! A partially torn CCL is painful and the pain causes disuse. Disuse can lead to further changes in joint health, muscle atrophy (weakness) and nobody wants their dog to be in pain. In addition, research shows your dog is at a higher risk (about 50%) to injure the other knee. Talk with your vet, Orthopedic surgeon, and canine rehab therapist; and make some decisions on how you are going to help your dog and do it as soon as you can. While some dogs can definitely be managed conservatively, and surgery is not appropriate for every CCL tear, I do need to say the unthinkable, if you choose to manage conservatively, there is still a RISK that down the road YOUR DOG MAY FULLY BLOW THEIR CCL and still REQUIRE SURGERY. Continue reading “Can CCL tears be managed conservatively…. it depends!”

Is your dog deadly hot?!?

Heatstroke can result in lose of consciousness, fever, organ failure and even death!

TOO HOT!

I’m not sure where you may be reading this from, but here in Nova Scotia, Canada, we have had a wet spring. Finally, things are starting to heat up! The following months should be filled with lazy summer afternoons, beach days, and sunny dogs walks. You may be tempted to take your pooch out with you for a run in the sun or to hang on the beach but do you know that your dog is actually more heat sensitive than you putting them at risk of heat exhaustion? Continue reading “Is your dog deadly hot?!?”

Tips for the enhancing the home environment for senior dogs

Just like us, as your four legged friend ages, they may have aches, pangs, and balance issues that affect their mobility. It’s important to help maintain their mobility as they are susceptible to the philosophy of “use-it; or lose-it”. We know from our own experience that if we decrease out activity, we get stiff and and once easy movements becomes difficult, heavier, and that sometimes we feel weaker and have pain/discomfort with once easy movements. The bottom-line is movement is medicine, regardless of how many legs you have. Proper exercise and nutrition help to prevent mobility loss, AND there are ways simple changes you can make to the home environment that encourage mobility thereby helping your senior dog maintain his/her quality of life.

Continue reading “Tips for the enhancing the home environment for senior dogs”